Definition and Introduction of SNUS, SNUFF, FILTER KHANI, Dipping Tobacco, Chewing Tobacco

Definition of SNUS
Details of SNUS/SNUFF/FILTER KHAINI Portions Packing Machine:

Snus (/ˈsnuːs/; Swedish pronunciation: [snʉːs]) is a moist powder tobacco product originating from a variant of dry snuff in early 18th-century Sweden. It is placed under the upper lip for extended periods. Snus is not fermented and contains no added sugar. Although used similarly to American dipping tobacco, snus does not typically result in the need for spitting and, unlike naswar, snus is steam-pasteurized.
The sale of snus is illegal in the European Union (except for Sweden, where it is legal), Belarus, and Russia. Local varieties of snus, growing in popularity in the United States, have been seen as an alternative to smoking, chewing, and dipping tobacco. However, as US-manufactured snus does not have the same production standards or ingredients as Swedish snus (the use of significant amounts of sugar in US products being one major difference), some believe that it should not be called "snus."
 
Confusion of SNUS and SNUFF
Confusingly, the English word "snuff" is translated to snus in Swedish, and the word "snuff" is often used in English to refer to both the nasal form and both the oral forms of snus and dipping tobacco.
However, snuff used in the nose is referred to as torrsnus (dry snuff) or, more correctly, as luktsnus ("smelling snuff") in Swedish. The moist form of snuff placed under the upper lip is called simply snus in Swedish.
The word "snuff" can also refer to dipping tobacco (also known as moist snuff), which is applied to the lower lip and the gums, rather than used nasally or placed under the upper lip. However snus, dry snuff, and dipping tobacco are distinct products.

Differences between SNUS and similar tobacco products
Some forms of tobacco consumed in the mouth may be categorized as:
  1. Scandinavian snus is a moist form of smokeless tobacco which is usually placed under the upper lip, and which does not result in the need for spitting. It is sold either as a moist powder known as loose snus, or prepackaged into pouches known as portion snus. Snus is often mildly flavored with food-grade smoke aroma, bergamot, citrus, juniper berry, herbs and/or floral flavors. Most Scandinavian snus is produced in Sweden and regulated as food under the Swedish Food Act.
  2. American snus, available since the late 1990s, is similar to the Scandinavian form, but usually has a lower moisture content and lower pH, resulting in lower bioavailability of nicotine than Scandinavian varieties, meaning less is available for absorption.[7] American snus is often flavored, e.g. with spearmint, wintergreen, vanilla or fruit (e.g. cherry), and may contain sugar.
  3. Nasal snuff (mostly English, German, and Scandinavian), referred to as luktsnus in Swedish and luktesnus in Norwegian, and as "Scotch snuff" in the US, is a dry, powdered form of snuff. It is insufflated – "sniffed" but not deeply "snorted" – through the nose. It is often mentholated or otherwise scented.
  4. Chewing tobacco (North American, European), also known as chew (or in some Southern US dialects as chaw), is tobacco in the form of short or long, loose leaf and stem strands (like pipe tobacco or longer), or less commonly of grinded leaves and stems compressed into blocks called plugs, or even finely ground pieces compressed into pellets. A few brands are cut into much finer loose strands, like cigarette rolling tobacco. Chew is placed between the cheek and the gums, or actively chewed. It causes copious salivation, especially when chewed, and due to its irritant (even nauseating) effect on the esophagus, this "juice" usually requires spitting. Chewing tobacco is a long-established North American form of tobacco (derived from traditional use of raw tobacco leaf by Indigenous peoples of the Americas), and is also legal in the European Union. Chewing tobacco is sometimes flavored, e.g. with wintergreen, apple, or cherry.
  5. Dipping tobacco (North American), also known as dip, spit tobacco or, ambiguously, as moist snuff, is a common American form of tobacco (also available in Canada and Mexico). It is moist, and somewhat finely ground, but less so than snus. Dipping tobacco (so called because users dip their fingers into the package to pinch a portion to insert into the mouth) is placed between the lower lip or cheek and the gums; it is not used nasally. As with chewing tobacco, salivation is copious, and usually spat out. Dipping tobacco is usually flavored, traditionally with wintergreen or mint, though many other flavorings are now available, while some unflavored brands remain popular. Beginning in the mid 1980s, several brands have packaged American dipping tobacco in porous pouches like those used for many brands of Scandinavian and American snus.
  6. Makla (Belgian and African) is a moist tobacco similar to Scandinavian snus in many respects. It is placed in the upper lip in a manner similar to snus; it differs in that it is more finely ground and has an even higher nicotine content and pH level. Sales within the European Union are legal due to its classification as a chewing tobacco. Its safety in comparison to snus has not been studied sufficiently.
  7. Naswar (Central Asian) is a moist, powdered form of tobacco, often green and sometimes caked with the mineral lime and/or wood ash. It is used like dipping tobacco or put under the tongue, and is pungent and often heavily flavored, e.g. with culinary oils (cardamom, sesame), the fruit lime, menthol, etc.
For Technical Inquiry and Commercial inquiry of SNUS, SNUFF, Filter Khaini, Chewing Tobacco, Dipping Tobacco packing machine, please contact Kevin Shz with Below contact ways:
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